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Teresa

5 Tips to Create a Good Branding Design Brief

When you have a new client, you want to make sure you do the best job possible in designing a new identity for them.  But how do you do that when you’re starting from a blank slate?  Here are some tips from us to help you create the best possible branding design brief.

1. Get to know the company and the product before you start designing.

Illustration by Teresa Pereira.

Illustration by Teresa Pereira.

Hey, if you’re producing a design, you need to know what your client’s company does.  Not only that, but you also need to know what the company sells, where it sells (local versus global market) and to whom it sells. If your client’s company has values (we’re assuming they do), it’s your job to inquire about those values and what values they would like communicated to the customer through their identity design.

Ask your client whether or not the competition should be taken into account; if your client says yes, ask how your client’s company can be differentiated from the competition.  The key with competition is to show your client that their design can be completely different from every other design in the market.  Let them know that innovation is on the forefront of your mind and that you’ll work hard to make their company stand out!

 

2. Define the target audience for your design.

"Novelty is a shopping boutique that retails casual apparel to chic young women with a taste for fresh, modern fashion. The shop started up as a project by Novelty's partners once they returned from the exciting and ever-evolving New York fashion scene." by Anagrama (MX).

Novelty is a shopping boutique that retails casual apparel to chic young women with a taste for fresh, modern fashion. The shop started up as a project by Novelty’s partners once they returned from the exciting and ever-evolving New York fashion scene.” by Anagrama (Mexico).

The more you know about your target audience, the better.  Get to know the details about whom your design will be reaching and communicating to. Ask your client detailed specifics such as: age, gender, profession and geographical location.  The more you know about your target market, the more informed you will be about making certain design decisions and setting an overall design direction. The resulting design has to make the right statement to the right people.

 

3. Gather the logo information.

Ask the specific words and concepts the logo should contain. Image from http://www.imagemme.com/blog/defining-brand-style-when-words-arent-enough/

Ask the specific words and concepts the logo should contain. Image from Imagemme.

If your client doesn’t yet have a logo, ask what specific words the logo should have and whether or not they would like a slogan to be incorporated.  Also make sure to ask the tone that your client would like the logo to communicate to potential customers.  If your client already has a logo but wants a redesign, ask why they want a logo and what their likes/dislikes are regarding the old logo.

 

4. Establish a design direction.

Modern minimalistic by My Visual Brief.

Here is an example of the design direction ‘Modern minimalistic’ for a brand identity project. By My Visual Brief.

In order to create a design in the right direction that aligns with the client’s visual expectations and preferences are, we first need to understand the client’s vision.

The best way to do that is to ask for three design examples of what they like and three design examples of what they don’t like.  This will help you understand where your client’s head is during the beginning of the design process to shape your initial thoughts.

Also remember to ask about specifications the client would like to include, and most importantly, exclude. For example, your client could tell you to avoid the color red and triangle shapes in the design.  These types of specifications are important to avoid future workflow interruptions.  If possible, specify colors, shapes, images and typography. This can help you better understand what your client wants.

 

5. Clarify your deliverables.

Mild Whistle by Oddds (Singapore).

Mild Whistle by Oddds (Singapore).

Above all, know what you need to deliver to your client.  For example, does your client want just a logo?  Or do they want a logo, business cards and stationary?  Help the client choose the deliverables in the most appropriate way for their goals. This will help you work in the sense of what the client is expecting to receive from you at the end of the design process.

 

We hope that these five steps will give you a solid start to your branding design brief and will enhance your budding relationship with your client.  Let your client give you any additional information that could be important in order for you to create the perfect identity for their company or product.  After all, that’s what it’s all about right?

Good luck!

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  • good information. thanks